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Day in the Life

Jun 19, 1834

Journal Entry

June 19, 1834 ~ Thursday

Again took up our march towards
Zion we continued to travel untill
we had arived within a few miles of
Liberty Clay County Missouri here we
pitched our tents and remained quite
a number of days on account of the
great excitement which prevailed in
consequence of false reports which were
abroad in the land respecting us. The ma
jority of the people or public opinion were
against us and even their were about
seventy men mounted on horseback
with firearms gathered together for the
intention of comeing against our
camp but the God of Israel frustr
ated their design for while they were
comeing against us the Lord rained
upon them rain and great hail so
that it was expedient for them to seek
shelter from the storm and after the stor
m they dispersed and would not go
against the camp. After remaining
stationary for several days the leading
men of Clay County and some principle

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The ma jority of the people or public opinion were against us and even their were about seventy men mounted on horseback with firearms gathered together for the intention of comeing against our camp but the God of Israel frustr ated their design for while they were comeing against us the Lord rained upon them rain and great hail so that it was expedient for them to seek shelter from the storm and after the stor m they dispersed and would not go against the camp.
~ Wilford Woodruff

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History – The History of Zion's Camp

Thursday 19th. At daybreak feeling that we were in a very unsafe situation, I counselled the camp to move forward without delay and con- tinue a lively march for about nine miles where we stopped for breakfast. While passing through Richmond, Br. Luke Johnson observed a black woman in a gentleman's garden near the road. She beckoned to him and said, "Come here massa"; she was evidently much agitated in her feelings. He went up to the fence and she said to him, "There is a company of men laying in wait here who are calcula- ting to kill you this morning as you pass through.["] We halted for breakfast on an eminance near a farm-house. The owner furnished us with a large quantity of milk which gave a great relish to our bacon and corn dodger which our company had purchased that morning. When we asked the price of his milk he replied, "He is a mean

Autobiography 1882 Leaves from My Journal

their enemies on the , by piling up the waters in Fishing River forty feet in one night, so our ene- mies could not cross. He also sent a great hail-storm which broke them up and sent them seeking for shelter. The camp of Zion arrived at Brother Burk's, in Clay County,

Autobiography 1883 Tullidge's Quarterly Magazine

their enemies on the , by piling up the waters in Fishing River forty feet in one night, so our enemies could not cross. He also sent a great hail-storm, which broke them up and sent them seeking for shelter. The Camp of Zion arrived at Brother Burk's, in Clay County, Missouri, on

Autobiography Volume 1 circa 1842-1865

would not let us pass through there town But in the morning of the we went through vary quietly before the people were up no one attempted to disturb us & we intended to go to Clay County that day but the Lord knew best what was for our good & he began to harden our progress soon one wheel broke down & another run of & one thing followed another to hinder us so that we did not travel ownly betwen the 2 forks of the fishing river we camped upon an Elevated peace of Ground having traveled ownly about 15 miles. Fishing river at this point was composed of seven small streams & those betwen which we had camped were two of them. As we halted and were makeing preparation for the night five men armed with guns rode into our camp & told us we see Hell enough before morning and there accompaning oath partook of all the malace of Demands they told us of the various companies of men forming to come against us to night. 60 from Richmond 70 from Clay 200 from Jackson &c all had sworn to destroy us. the weather was pleasant at this time all was calm & sereane but as soon as the men left the camp there was a small cloud as big as a mans hand seen & it soon began to spread with great rapidity & in a few moments the whole Heavens gathered blackness & a mightly storm burst with fury upon the Heads of our Enemies the storm tremendious the wind Hail & rain & thunder met our Enemies in great wrath & soon softened their direful courage and frustrated all their plans to "kill Joe Smith" & his Armey. Instead of fighting they crawled into waggons & under them & into Hollow trees one company filled an old shanty & held the bridles of their Horses betwen the logs of the cabbin till the Horses were so pelted with hail they broke the brid[l]es across the fingers of their owners & fleed many miles before the storm leaving their riders to suck the Blood

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Jun 19, 1834